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Thread: make MacOSX applications with RS XE2 (step-by-step)

  1. #1

    make MacOSX applications with RS XE2 (step-by-step)

    i've found this link
    some good points about how to setting up Delphi XE2 in OSX

    http://www.simonjstuart.com/2011/09/...strated-guide/

  2. #2
    Interesting, and it is a move in the right direction of Embarcadero. Still, I feel it is quite a compomise. Developing Mac programs on a PC, cross-compiling, that doesn't feel right, feels like a detour. The opposite was possible in the past, when Metrowerks made a PC compiler that ran on the Mac. I never touched it.

  3. #3
    Personally I am finding it awesome. I can work on my PC with my comfortable environment on my 27" screen - and compile and watch the result on my MacBook. So far there have been many hurdles and working out what does and does not work on the Mac but my first cross platform app is now about 50% done.
    The views expressed on this programme are bloody good ones. - Fred Dagg

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Ingemar View Post
    Interesting, and it is a move in the right direction of Embarcadero. Still, I feel it is quite a compomise. Developing Mac programs on a PC, cross-compiling, that doesn't feel right, feels like a detour. The opposite was possible in the past, when Metrowerks made a PC compiler that ran on the Mac. I never touched it.
    Actually, I'm on this with Czar. You make an application on your main PC with FireMonkey and even debug it. Then, you simply change platform in IDE and viola, it works and looks exactly the same on Mac! The difference in specs between my main PC and Mac is quite large, so I'm glad I can keep working on main PC and test stuff on the Mac remotely (it will be quite expensive to match the Mac with my PC, getting Core i7 and high-performance RAM). Also, on Mac in the majority of IDEs, Lazarus included, I found the 3-key shortcuts and all these weird-looking special buttons difficult to get used to.

    By the way, those who develop for iOS using Delphi XE 2 should get Update 1, which improves performance by large margin (I'm surprised there's no news about it here on PGD).

  5. #5
    PGD Staff / News Reporter Stoney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lifepower View Post
    Also, on Mac in the majority of IDEs, Lazarus included, I found the 3-key shortcuts and all these weird-looking special buttons difficult to get used to.
    There is just one 3-key shortcut you need on Lazarus: CTRL+SHIFT+C , which is code completion: You have made the interface section of your class, place your cursor in there somewhere and press this combination and Lazarus magically builds you the implementation part. (It's also the same combination as on any other platform.)
    Most other useful combination are just two keys:
    CMD + R : Run and debug application (Lazarus and Xcode)
    CMD + U : Unindent code block
    CMD + I : Indent code block


    My setup is exactly the other way round: I'm using Lazarus on Mac OS X with a display port adapter for my big screen if I need it. Debugging is working, I made a tutorial on how to set it up a while back and for Windows I made a FPC cross-compiler. Everything works smoothly (granted, sometimes Lazarus is not as responsive on Mac OS X as on Windows), but I didn't use Windows for development in quite a while.
    Freeze Development | Elysion Game Framework | Twitter: @Stoney_FD
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  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Stoney View Post
    There is just one 3-key shortcut you need on Lazarus: CTRL+SHIFT+C , which is code completion:
    The 3-key combinations I find particularly annoying are Step into/Step over, Toggle form/unit view, View Object Inspector, View Units and View Forms. In Delphi/Lazarus on Windows the first three are 1-key, while the other two are 2-key. Debugging keys are essential and very common to use; I can't believe you have to hit 3 keys for every single line of code, same applies to Form/Unit view.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stoney View Post
    Most other useful combination are just two keys:
    CMD + R : Run and debug application (Lazarus and Xcode)
    CMD + U : Unindent code block
    CMD + I : Indent code block
    In Delphi they are F9, Tab and Shift+Tab respectively (Delphi versions previous to XE 2 need CnWizards for code block indentation). They are shorter and more intuitive.
    Last edited by LP; 07-10-2011 at 03:41 PM.

  7. #7
    PGD Staff / News Reporter Stoney's Avatar
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    I think after a while you get used to the shortcuts, at least that has always been my experience.
    I don't think the Lazarus team will change the shortcuts on Mac OS, as most of them are the same on Xcode, which is I find rather pleasing, personally, as I've been doing a lot of Xcode development these days.
    Freeze Development | Elysion Game Framework | Twitter: @Stoney_FD
    Check out my new book: Irrlicht 1.7.1 Realtime 3D Engine Beginner's Guide (It's C++ flavored though)

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  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Lifepower View Post
    Also, on Mac in the majority of IDEs, Lazarus included, I found the 3-key shortcuts and all these weird-looking special buttons difficult to get used to.
    I can assure you that it is even worse to use a PC when you are used to the Mac, with a totally illogical mix of F-number, ctrl-something, alt-and-then-something, etc. I have seen mixes of all three in one program. And surely there are multi-key shortcuts too? I just wish all the PC programs could do the fairly reasonable ctrl-something (except that the ctrl key is badly placed for the task).

    I have worked a lot on the PC, with CodeWarrior in particular, and never got used to the mix. It really is three different systems in parallel. On the Mac, all programs use the command-something system (with extra modifiers when you run out of keys, can be very intuitive when done right, cmd-R for run, cmd-alt-R for run with debugger, for instance).

    Thus, the solution won't attract any people from the Mac side. It looks like a pure port-to-Mac solution. But if you never get to like and understand the Mac systems, won't your ports be bad?

  9. #9
    PGD Staff / Super Moderator code_glitch's Avatar
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    Ingemar: Don't worry, windows may be bad, but I find mac atrocious. I use linux almost the entire time (bar school computers 30mins a week) and although there are differences between the two, eg. the number of times I hit alt+F2 or Ctrl+alt+t on windows is frightening I find mac horrible: where ctrl + C is copy on just about everything under the sun mac goes and screws up all the standard ones...

    Although I agree with the last thing about ports, I think it is more to get windows devs to get windows apps to mac - not the other way round... It would not surprise me one bit to learnt hat apple wants all the windows apps too but give nothing back...

    As to what was said earlier, 3 key shortcuts are generally a no-no but in the case of ctrl+alt+t I love that one
    I once tried to change the world. But they wouldn't give me the source code. Damned evil cunning.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Ingemar View Post
    Thus, the solution won't attract any people from the Mac side. It looks like a pure port-to-Mac solution. But if you never get to like and understand the Mac systems, won't your ports be bad?
    Because in business, not always you develop an application you like, for a platform you like. Sometimes you don't even have enough time to fully understand the platform you are developing for because of limited time-frames and budget.

    By the way, there's a web page that illustrates some applications and poor GUI design choices. If you haven't already seen it, check Interface Hall of Shame.

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