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Thread: Have questions? Post them to us here!

  1. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Cybermonkey View Post
    I can recommend (if you want to have some retro sounds) the software on this page: http://www.drpetter.se/project_sfxr.html
    Absolutely easy to use and creates some nice effects.
    AMEN!

    cheers,
    Paul

  2. #22
    This might be a silly question, but does the game have to be able to run on all of the judges' systems?

  3. #23
    Having been a judge in a previous competition and a competitor in others I would say that each judge needs to have the possibility of judging an entry on at least one configuration owned by a judge. If is it not possible for a judge to play an entry at all, then that entry would not be scored by that judge. (This in fact has happened in previous competitions.)

  4. #24
    Co-Founder / PGD Elder WILL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperMaximo93 View Post
    This might be a silly question, but does the game have to be able to run on all of the judges' systems?
    All, no. At least one per judge, yes!

    We have all the available systems for you to target as a convenience, but you really only have to make your game for at least one that each judge will be able to play so that we can score the games.

    If you do make more than one port (Win32 and OS X just for example) it might help should one of our systems have an issue with a version of OpenGL that you are using or something like that. If the other port works fine for that judge with the issue, then the other port kinda saves you. So it can help, but it's not necessary.

    I'd however, like to offer should anyone be unsure and concerned that one of our systems might not run your game. Upload it somewhere and ask me to try it. I'm sure Stoney would mind either as long as it's not several versions from everyone. That might be a bit time consuming.


    Also we shouldn't have to install anything other than your game it's self to be able to play it. This last part is so that it's fair for the judges who have to play 10 or 20+ games and don't have a huge mess on our systems at the end of it. Doesn't hurt to keep the judges happy with a friendly installer or simple zip file either.
    Jason McMillen
    Pascal Game Development
    Co-Founder





  5. #25
    Cool, just the answer I was hoping for Thanks!

  6. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by WILL View Post
    Also we shouldn't have to install anything other than your game it's self to be able to play it. This last part is so that it's fair for the judges who have to play 10 or 20+ games and don't have a huge mess on our systems at the end of it. Doesn't hurt to keep the judges happy with a friendly installer or simple zip file either.
    This makes me think.

    Actually I decided to work in Windows so I'm sure the judges will be able to play my game (even Linux and MacOS can run Windows applications using WineHQ, and Allegro does work using Wine with almost no problems). So my package will include the DLL file used by Allegro, no problem about this.

    But what about Linux systems? POSIX systems "needs" to install and configure the libraries to make them available for applications. Allegro includes optimizations for a lot of different system configurations so the best is to compile and install it instead of just copy some "dot s o files".

    It isn't a real question, just a comment.
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  7. #27

    Cool

    Quote Originally Posted by SilverWarior View Post
    The base concept in moodule music files is very similar to MIDI files except that instead of unstruments smal sound samples are used. And by changing sample's playing frequency you get similar effect than different tones of instrument. Also the module music files support a bunch of different effects wich can be easily used for each sound your need whenever you need.
    I have an advantage: Allegro includes it's own MIDI driver (was added because Linux' sound drivers have native MIDI support only if the sound card supports it). The advantage is that this driver needs sound samples to work, so it's similar to the MOD you're talking about, so it sounds the same in all computers, you can configure Allegro in a way that it overrides the system's MIDI driver even if it has "native" MIDI support. Also you can define your own "sound palette" just modifying the samples to use.

    That's one thing I love.
    Last edited by Ñuño Martínez; 24-06-2011 at 09:00 AM.
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  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by ?ëu?±o Mart??nez View Post
    But what about Linux systems? POSIX systems "needs" to install and configure the libraries to make them available for applications. Allegro includes optimizations for a lot of different system configurations so the best is to compile and install it instead of just copy some "dot s o files".
    Since I'm the only judge with a Linux partition: I actually don't mind compiling a few libraries or compiling your game on Linux if needs be. (But there should be some kind of makefile or build script.)
    If you decide to package an additional Linux version I'll definitely try to run your game and "compiling something" won't be an obstacle.
    Freeze Development | Elysion Game Framework | Twitter: @Stoney_FD
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    Programmer: A device for converting coffein into software.

  9. #29
    Co-Founder / PGD Elder WILL's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ?ëu?±o Mart??nez View Post
    But what about Linux systems?
    I do not have Linux installed so you wouldn't get any points from me if you make it Linux only unfortunately.

    This is also part of the problem I've found with Linux, it's not very user friendly despite the Ubuntu team's best efforts it's still just a very polished version of an OS designed for programmers and network geeks. Most people will not use Linux even today because of this and I've lost interest in it since I've come to discover how nice Mac OS X is. I'm not saying that Linux is bad, just that I have no personal interest in it because of it's design issues.
    Jason McMillen
    Pascal Game Development
    Co-Founder





  10. #30
    PGD Staff code_glitch's Avatar
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    Ah. Hem. This is a problem: what if your game used to run on windows but now runs on anything except windows?

    A latest code hack in the engine to do with threading and arrays has had no effect on the breed of nix based operating systems Mac OS, Ubuntu etc. However windows seems to manage memory in a more illogical way and now refuses to run - gdb says nothing is wrong except for the 400 odd runtime and memory access violations per second. The worst part being GDB is anything but helpful in diagnosing anything...
    I once tried to change the world. But they wouldn't give me the source code. Damned evil cunning.

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