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Thread: Nice IDEs for Linux and Windows?

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Andru View Post
    I have used Geany a lot of time, but lately I'm using Lazarus with docking mode for projects. For fast editing pas files without debugging - Geany is pretty good solution.
    So it has no debugging coupling? Then it sounds like an editor and not and IDE. (But I know that that distinction is often confusing and people but the limit differently.)

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Ingemar View Post
    So it has no debugging coupling?
    It does have GDB support with a plugin called GeanyGDB (which can be installed from the package geany-plugins). I've never tested this plugin with FPC though, so I can't say if it works.
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  3. #13
    PGD Staff code_glitch's Avatar
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    For me, an IDE is a good editor with built in compiler support, and as stoney points out, it does have its share of plugins for those extra bits you might want - I tend to find that if my code crashes my custom debug code, gdb doesn't fare much better...
    I once tried to change the world. But they wouldn't give me the source code. Damned evil cunning.

  4. #14
    So it has no debugging coupling? Then it sounds like an editor and not and IDE. (But I know that that distinction is often confusing and people but the limit differently.)
    Yep, just an editor. There is a debgger plugin, but only for C/C++. You won't find good FPC-oriented IDE under Linux and Windows, so the only variant - Lazarus. Or old version of Eclipse with Pascaline plugin(but I haven't tried it yet).

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by code_glitch View Post
    For me, an IDE is a good editor with built in compiler support, and as stoney points out, it does have its share of plugins for those extra bits you might want - I tend to find that if my code crashes my custom debug code, gdb doesn't fare much better...
    Crashes are not always easy to catch in GDB, but if you can single-step, set breakpoints and watch variables, then I'd call it usable.

    I think an IDE is a lot more than an editor with compiler support. That would make any stupid script turn an editor into an IDE. For me, the editor is a small part of the IDE. There is so much more, like code navigation, proper error reporting... I tried formulating a definition of the term IDE once but I left it since I got pessimistic, feeling that everybody seems to have a different pet feature that they will demand to be there or it isn't an IDE at all, like GUI layouts, class browsers... while at the same time some people will refer to full-blown IDEs as "editors", and some insist that Emacs is an IDE. So nobody would care about me suggesting a formal definition.

    Anyway, it seems that the conclusion is that Lazarus is the one to try for an IDE with FPC support. Sometimes I think that a modernized version of the FPC IDE would be quite right, but as it is, it feels to much of a clone of Turbo Pascal from the 80's. (Not that Turbo Pascal was bad but some things, like everything visual, feel so crude today.)

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Ingemar View Post
    it seems that the conclusion is that Lazarus is the one to try
    ...but please don't stop suggesting!

  7. #17
    One more thing: What if I want an IDE where I can comfortably (or somewhat comfortably) mix languages? Like, C and FPC?

  8. #18
    What if I want an IDE...
    You should write it by your self

  9. #19
    I'm quite into VIM actually, but that's not an IDE. When you use VIM, you trade comfort for high availability and flexibility. You can use it anywhere, in any shell or operating system, for any language/task. The harder part is to customize it to your needs. There are some nice plugins for it so it can do a lot of things IDE's can. However, VIM is not some easy tool. It takes serious effort to get familiar with it.

    For "pascal" development, I still use lazarus.
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  10. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by Andru View Post
    You should write it by your self
    I guess so, but I am a little bit tired of spending a lot of time writing tools that nobody else needs, and there should be a whole lot of alternatives for Windows.

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